WATERSHED & STEWARDSHIP PROJECTS LIST

The watershed resources enhancement, restoration implementation, and study/research projects mapped below have recently been completed or are underway as a result of the efforts of acwForum Member agencies, organizations and their partners.

Fish Screens at Pond Diversions
Underway
Alameda County Water District

Timeframe:  2009-2021

Part of the steelhead protection effort includes the installation of fish screens on water diversion facilities. The Alameda County Water District (ACWD) will install fish screens on pipes, used to divert water from the Alameda Creek Flood Control Channel, to prevent entry of migrating steelhead. Fish screens have been installed at three diversion locations: Mission Boulevard, Bunting Pond, and Kaiser Pond. Fish screens for  Shinn Pond are planned as a future project.

Project Location:
Kaiser Pond is located due south of Niles Community Park, just across Alameda Creek. 
Shinn Pond is located between Rancho Arroyo Park and Niles Community Park.

link ›     map ›

Buckland, Evan, Evan.Buckland@acwd.com

Lower Rubber Dam Removal
Completed
Alameda County Water District

Timeframe: 2009

As part of its water supply operations the Alameda County Water District (ACWD) owns and operates a series of inflatable rubber dams and diversion pipes located the Lower Alameda Creek Flood Control Channel. The dams and diversions were identified as impediments to anadromous fish passage between the Upper Alameda Creek Watershed and the San Francisco Bay. In 2009, as part of a regional fisheries restoration effort, ACWD permanently removed (decommissioned) the Lower Rubber Dam. The dam foundation slab, kept in place as a channel grade control sill, was modified to include a fishway. Dam removal and fishway installation addressed passage at ACWD’s most downstream facility.  

Project Location: 
In the City of Fremont, within the Alameda Creek Flood Control Channel adjacent to the Quarry Lakes Regional Recreational Area.

link ›     map ›

Buckland, Evan, Evan.Buckland@acwd.com

BART Weir and Middle Rubber Dam Fish Ladder
Planned
Alameda County Water District




Timeframe: 2019-2021

The existing "BART weir", constructed by the Army Corps of Engineers to protect railroad piers from scour, presents a significant barrier to fish migration through the lower Alameda Creek. The Alameda County Flood Control District (ACFCD) has ownership and maintenance responsibility of the "BART weir". Upstream of the BART weir, the  Alameda County Water District (ACWD) owns and operates the Middle Rubber Dam (RD1) as part of its water supply facilities.  When raised, the dam is an impediment to fish passage. Due to the adjacency of the two facilities, the ACWD and ACFCD are partnering to design and construct a fish ladder to provide fish passage over both the BART weir and RD1. These efforts will help fish, specifically steelhead, revert back to their historical runs through Alameda Creek and the Upper Alameda Creek Watershed. 

Project Location: 
In the City of Fremont, within the Alameda Creek Flood Control Channel at the flood control drop structure (BART weir) adjacent to the Quarry Lakes Regional Recreation Area.

link ›     map ›

Buckland, Evan, Evan.Buckland@acwd.com

Upper Rubber Dam Fish Ladder
Planned
Alameda County Water District

Timeframe:  2018

Furthering the effort to increase fish passage through Alameda Creek to/from the Upper Watershed, the Alameda County Water District will install a fish ladder at its Upper Rubber Dam (RD3).  This will allow steelhead to access the channel upstream of RD3, near Mission Boulevard.

Project Location:
City of Fremont, within the Alameda Creek Flood Control Channel in the vicinity of Mission Boulevard and the Union Pacific Railroad tracks.

link ›     map ›

Buckland, Evan, Evan.Buckland@acwd.com

Adopt-A-Creek locations along Alameda Creek
Underway
Alameda Creek Alliance

In an effort to increase stream health, provide watershed education, and integrate the community the Alameda County Forum established designated locations along the Alameda Creek or "adopt-a-spots" to act as a specific site for projects (i.e. creek clean ups, planting efforts). Through the Alameda County Flood Control's Adopt-a-Spot and Adopt-a-Creek Program the Forum has adopted two sites along Alameda Creek: the Niles Canyon Staging area and the William Cann Memorial Civic Center adopted spot. 

Project Location(s): 
Niles Staging Area, Alameda Creek Trail, Fremont, CA ‎ 
William Cann Memorial Civic Center, Union City, CA - featured in map link.

link ›     map ›

Jeff Miller, alamedacreekalliance@gmail.com

Arroyo Mocho Off-Stream Livestock Watering Trough (EPA2014SS)
Underway
ACRCD / NRCS / private landowner [location not mapped]

ALAMEDA CREEK HEALTHY WATERSHED PROGRAM
Project site 2014-SS is located in the Arroyo Mocho sub-watershed on privately-owned rangeland. An existing water trough is located on the bank of a drainage that flows into Arroyo Mocho. The placement of the old trough draws cattle into the drainage and increases trampling, grazing, and erosion in the vicinity. Uncontrolled grazing of riparian areas contributes to turbidity and limits vegetation cover in the riparian corridor.

The project involves the installation of a new off-stream livestock watering trough set back from creeks and drainages. The trough requires a new water source and conveyance to reliably supply water during periods of drought. Upon completion of the new water system the old trough will be decommissioned and removed. The placement of the new water trough will reduce livestock impacts to vegetation that filters sediment and stabilizes soils near the creek. Vegetation cover is being monitored, and permanent photograph monitoring points have been established. The project is supported by EPA San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund grant no. W9-00T94801 and the landowner.

Ian Howell, ian.howell@acrcd.org

Upland Watering Trough and Riparian Exclusion Fencing (EPA2014JG)
Underway
ACRCD / NRCS / private landowner [location not mapped]

ALAMEDA CREEK HEALTHY WATERSHED PROGRAM
Project site 2014-JG is located in the Arroyo Mocho sub-watershed on privately-owned rangeland. Water facilities for livestock are limited to lowland areas, making it difficult to distribute livestock on the property’s uplands. The creek is a primary water source in the lowlands, and livestock impacts to the riparian area decrease vegetation cover and appear to be contributing to streambank sloughing and erosion.

The project involves the installation of a new off-stream livestock watering trough in an upland field that has abundant forage, but limited water. The placement of the new water trough on high ground allows better grazing of available forage and provides an alternative to the creek. A riparian exclusion fence will be installed along the creek to limit livestock access to steep streambanks and to create a buffer area. Vegetation cover is being monitored, and permanent photograph monitoring points have been established. The project is supported by EPA San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund grant no. W9-00T94801 and the landowner.

Ian Howell, ian.howell@acrcd.org

Brush Check Dam Installation (EPA2013MM)
Completed
ACRCD / NRCS / private landowner [location not mapped]

ALAMEDA CREEK HEALTHY WATERSHED PROGRAM
Project 2013-MM is located in the Arroyo Mocho sub-watershed on privately-owned rangeland. An ephemeral drainage on the property has eroded and cut downwards. Sheet erosion from a neighboring property is believed to increase flow intensity in the drainage and transport sediment.

The project involves stabilizing the ephemeral drainage to reduce erosion and improve water quality. Six brush check dams were installed along the approximately 320-foot channel in late 2014. The area was seeded to reestablish grasses along the drainage and new riparian exclusion fencing controls grazing within the drainage. The check dams have stabilized grade down-cutting and capture sediment that would otherwise flow downstream. Plantings of native willow, cottonwood, gooseberries, etc. are becoming established alongside the channel and within some check dams to provide long-term stability. Permanent photograph monitoring points have been established and vegetation cover may be evaluated.  The project is supported by the landowner. EPA San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund grant no. W9-00T94801 may be used to support additional check dams and native plantings.

Ian Howell, ian.howell@acrcd.org

Grazing Management Plan for Erosion Reduction (EPA2013GS)
Underway
ACRCD / NRCS / private landowner [location not mapped]

ALAMEDA CREEK HEALTHY WATERSHED PROGRAM
Project EPA2013-GS is located in the Arroyo Del Valle sub-watershed and affects two creek drainages on the privately-owned rangeland property. Previous grazing intensity left limited vegetation cover; some fields were grazed bare. Livestock have had access to riparian areas for grazing and watering. Uncontrolled grazing of riparian areas and exposed upland soils increase erosion and stream turbidity.

Fields have been seeded and rested, and a grazing management plan has been implemented to increase forage production and maintain soil cover. New cross-fencing excludes livestock from targeted riparian areas. Vegetation cover and composition are being monitored, and permanent photograph monitoring points have been established. Modeling will demonstrate the relative change in erosion before and after implementation. The project is supported by EPA San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund grant no. W9-00T94801 and the landowner.

Ian Howell, ian.howell@acrcd.org

Gully Management for Erosion Stabilization (EPA2013PB.Pa)
Underway
ACRCD / NRCS / private land manager [location not mapped]

ALAMEDA CREEK HEALTHY WATERSHED PROGRAM
Project EPA2013PB.Pa straddles the Alameda Creek and Arroyo del Valle sub-watersheds on public land that is managed by a private grazing lessee. The project includes a hillside erosion control project to address sediment loss and gullies formed from concentrated road runoff. An engineered collection basin will funnel water to the bottom of the hill where a rock-lined outlet dissipate energy. The gullies will be graded and seeded to stabilize erosion. Fencing has been installed to facilitate grazing of a large field encompassing a creek drainage and livestock ponds. The new cross-fencing prevents excessive soil compaction and sedimentation, which affect water quality and pond habitat.

The gullies have been surveyed and sediment erosion rates and volumes have been estimated. Permanent photograph monitoring points have been established. The project is supported by EPA San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund grant no. W9-00T94801 and the lessee.

Ian Howell, ian.howell@acrcd.org

Arroyo Las Positas Off-Stream Water System (EPA2014NB)
Underway
ACRCD / NRCS / private landowner [location not mapped]

ALAMEDA CREEK HEALTHY WATERSHED PROGRAM
Project EPA2014-NB is located in the Arroyo Las Positas sub-watershed on privately-owned rangeland. Water facilities for livestock are limited in the main grazing fields, making it difficult to distribute livestock on the property’s uplands. Past grazing has effectively removed all forage materials and vegetation cover, decreasing filtration and increasing soil erosion.

The project involves the installation of a new off-stream livestock water system (spring, tank, trough). The new water source will allow better forage utilization and provides an alternative to a pond that provides beneficial wildlife habitat. New fencing and a grazing management plan ensure greater control over the timing and duration of grazing. Intensely grazed areas have been seeded to improve plant productivity. The practices are expected to improve soil stability and increase water filtration. Vegetation cover and composition are being monitored, and permanent photograph monitoring points have been established. Modeling will demonstrate the relative change in overall soil erosion before and after implementation of conservation practices. The project is supported by EPA San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund grant no. W9-00T94801 and the landowner.

Ian Howell, ian.howell@acrcd.org

Altamont Creek Confluence
Completed
ACRCD / NRCS / Zone 7 Water

ALAMEDA CREEK HEALTHY WATERSHED PROGRAM
The Altamont Creek Confluence Planting Project involves planting cover vegetation to improve water quality along Altamont Creek (Arroyo Las Positas sub-watershed). Compaction and alkali soils make plant establishment difficult on exposed streambanks with limited topsoil and evidence of sheet and rill erosion. The area is heavily trafficked by users of an adjacent neighborhood park and multi-use trail.

The Watershed Nursery propagated plants from locally collected seeds. The East Bay Civic Corps prepared the site for planting, and community volunteers installed over 700 plants in February 2015 with the project partners and the Hands-on Conservation program. Pacheco Brothers Gardening, Inc. is providing watering services during the summer season while the plants become established. The Living Arroyos program has also provided watering and maintenance assistance. The project is supported by EPA San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund grant no. W9-00T94801 and by Zone 7. Vegetation survivorship is being monitored, as well as percentage vegetation cover. Permanent photograph monitoring points and monitoring transects have been established.

  map ›

Ian Howell, ian.howell@acrcd.org

Altamont Creek Willow
Completed
ACRCD / NRCS / Zone 7 Water

ALAMEDA CREEK HEALTHY WATERSHED PROGRAM
The Altamont Creek Willow Demonstration Project addresses streambank erosion and streambed incision within the Arroyo Las Positas sub-watershed. Erosion will eventually threaten infrastructure and property, including Zone 7’s service road, which also serves as a recreation path. Shelterbelt Builders, Inc. was contracted to harvest willows and to plant the cuttings at critical out-bends. The live willow plantings are expected to survive and root, stabilizing priority areas. The project is supported by EPA San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund grant no. W9-00T94801 and leveraged funds from Zone 7. 

Implementation occurred in January 2016. Selective harvesting was conducted along Wildcat Creek in North Richmond. Assessments of plant growth and streambank stability will be conducted throughout 2016, and permanent photograph monitoring points have been established.

  map ›

Ian Howell, ian.howell@acrcd.org

Arroyo II
Completed
ACRCD/NRCS/SFPUC

In fall 2011, the Conservation Partnership implemented a streambank stabilization and willow riparian scrub restoration project along a 300-foot section of creek between Pleasanton and Sunol, near the intersection of Koopmann Road and Pleasanton-Sunol Road. The project was designed to reduce streambank erosion, establish vegetation, and improve riparian habitat.

link ›     map ›

Katie Bergmann, katie.bergmann@ca.usda.gov